Chris Hoover, Dr. Ariel Plotek, Susan Nelson, and Elizabeth Dackson chat with host Pat Sloan on the American Patchwork & Quilting podcast.

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Guest: Chris Hoover of Whirligig Designs

Topics: color

She says: "If you can't decide what colors you want, look at pictures. Find a picture that has all the colors in it that you like or an object. One year I found a skein of yarn that I just loved. It was purples and greens and blues. I thought, that's really cool. That's the color I want my quilt to be."

Visit whirligigdesigns.com.

Guest: Dr. Ariel Plotek, Curator at the San Diego Museum of Art

Topics: art exhibits

She says: "I think it will come as quite a surprise to many of our visitors to see these same ideas (of art and design) were so intuitively understood by quiltmakers, by women who had no such formal training, but who had just an innate understanding of the effects of color, texture when it comes to the use of different materials."

Visit sdmart.org/art/exhibit/quilts-and-color-museum-fine-arts-boston.

Guest: Susan Nelson

Topics: Folded Corner Clipper

She says: "There are so many designs that use the folded corners, for example if you're going to use a snowball block and you put little squares in the corner and then you draw a line on that little square, stitch on that line, then cut off the excess corner. And I just didn't like drawing those pencil lines...It just seemed to me that if you're going to have to trim that corner anyways, why not trim the corner and trim it accurately, then use that cut edge as your seam guide?"

Visit blog.prairieskyquilting.com.

Guests: Elizabeth Dackson

Topics: paper piecing

She says: "For new paper-piecers, I recommend taking a couple of minutes to take your piece of paper over to something like a nice window or sliding glass door, something that has nice natural light shining through it. Then you can take a quick moment and trace a couple of lines from the front, it's really easy to see through the template when you put it up against the nice light source. It will give you just a little bit of guidance on the back side where you're actually placing your fabrics."

Visit dontcallmebetsy.com.

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