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Machine Minute - Specialty Stitches: Wing Needle

Try a wing needle with your sewing machine's heirloom stitches for beautiful results!

Thu, 22 Aug 2013|

I'm Jennifer, here with another Machine Minute brought to you by Baby Lock and the Crescendo machine. I think that you have more potential in your sewing machine than you might know, and one of the ways you can make the most of it is by using some of the decorative stitches. Now when you go to the notions aisle there are lots of other options that you maybe haven't experimented with yet and one of my favorite, often underutilized needles is the wing needle. It's different from a standard needle, and let me show you how. The difference between a standard needle and the wing needle is on the shaft. A standard needle is tapered to a point and has smooth sides. You'll notice that the wing needle has just what is says -- wings that come out on either side, and that's what makes the little holes in the eyelet stitch. A wing needle can be used with almost any stitch on your machine that is identified as an heirloom stitch, so check your machine's manual. That heirloom stitch in combination with a wing needle will give you some of those beautiful stitches. Now, I've chosen an eyelet stitch on the machine, and all I've done is replaced the machine needle with the wing needle. I've selected the eyelet stitch with is an heirloom stitch and I'm ready to begin sewing. The one thing you need to know about using a wing needle is you want to sew on a looser weave of fabric. I've chosen linen blend but any loose weave fabric will work. Cotton fabrics are typically too tight. They won't allow the wing needle to make that hole so you can see through the eyelets, and that's really the desired effect of an heirloom stitch. So I'm making napkins to give as gifts and I'm just adding an eyelet stitch around the outside. I've got contrasting thread here, but often heirloom stitches are also seen on garments or christening gowns --things that you can see white thread and white linen and you want a delicate look. Give the wing needle a try and try an heirloom stitch on your machine and you might find you've got more to explore than you've ever dreamed. I'm Jennifer, here with another Machine Minute brought to you by Baby Lock and the Crescendo machine. I think that you have more potential in your sewing machine than you might know, and one of the ways you can make the most of it is by using some of the decorative stitches. Now when you go to the notions aisle there are lots of other options that you maybe haven't experimented with yet and one of my favorite, often underutilized needles is the wing needle. It's different from a standard needle, and let me show you how. The difference between a standard needle and the wing needle is on the shaft. A standard needle is tapered to a point and has smooth sides. You'll notice that the wing needle has just what is says -- wings that come out on either side, and that's what makes the little holes in the eyelet stitch. A wing needle can be used with almost any stitch on your machine that is identified as an heirloom stitch, so check your machine's manual. That heirloom stitch in combination with a wing needle will give you some of those beautiful stitches. Now, I've chosen an eyelet stitch on the machine, and all I've done is replaced the machine needle with the wing needle. I've selected the eyelet stitch with is an heirloom stitch and I'm ready to begin sewing. The one thing you need to know about using a wing needle is you want to sew on a looser weave of fabric. I've chosen linen blend but any loose weave fabric will work. Cotton fabrics are typically too tight. They won't allow the wing needle to make that hole so you can see through the eyelets, and that's really the desired effect of an heirloom stitch. So I'm making napkins to give as gifts and I'm just adding an eyelet stitch around the outside. I've got contrasting thread here, but often heirloom stitches are also seen on garments or christening gowns --things that you can see white thread and white linen and you want a delicate look. Give the wing needle a try and try an heirloom stitch on your machine and you might find you've got more to explore than you've ever dreamed.