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May 22, 2017 Podcast

Heather Givans and Lynette Jensen chat with host Pat Sloan on the American Patchwork & Quilting podcast.

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Listen to the podcast here.

Subscribe to the free show on iTunes here.

 

Guest: Heather Givans

Topics: designing quilts

She says: "I really try to not shy away from something that I feel like I should do. For example, when I was working on Paper Obsessed (fabric line) I had a vision of making this paper airplane quilt that all these paper airplanes would look they were flying. You know how a paper airplane's path feels like it’s kind of random. It will float up and immediately nosedive. I wanted to make a quilt that had that feeling to it. But I’d never done such a large improv project before. So, of course, I like to do it right in the moment when it counts. You just have to be fearless."

Visit crimsontate.com.

 

Guest: Lynette Jensen

Topics: quilting trends

She says: "I see change going on in the quilting, which certaintly reflects the same changes we're seeing socially. The fact that you and I are doing a podcast is one of them. And, of course, the influence of the internet and the number of people who communicate and belong to groups like yours through the internet is a change. Technology has certainly made it easier for people to connect all over the world. There's also a real difference in the number of people coming into the craft who do not have a sewing background like you and I did. So they are starting from a point where it would be beneficial in their busy lives (because so many of them are working outside the home in the younger age group) that things be simple and easy to achieve."

Visit thimbleberries.com/blog.

 

Guest: Pat Sloan

Topics: quilt piecing tips

She says: "I noticed sometimes there were quilts where there would be a border on three sides and there would be no border on one long side, and I learned that one of the reasons that might be is because the beds were pushed up against the wall. And quiltmakers have always been practical people, and if you're going to use the quilt on the bed and no one is going to see that border over there, why should you add it?...When I started making quilts for beds, I was putting pillows on top of the quilt at the top of the bed, and I thought, 'I don't need the top border as wide as the others.'"

Visit blog.patsloan.com.