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June 9, 2014 Podcast

Listen to host Pat Sloan chat with guests Deb Luttrell, Rachel May, and Pat Meinecke on the American Patchwork & Quilting podcast.

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Deb Luttrell
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Rachel May
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Pat Meinecke

Listen to the podcast here.

Guest: Deb Luttrell of Stitchin' Heaven

Topics: quilt cruises

She says: "Usually on our seven day cruises, we have three days at sea. We have three teachers, we assign you a place (and we assign you with your friends so they're in your area together), and you never have to leave. And our teachers rotate to each class and do their teaching, but the sewing doesn't end at the end of class. We have a lot of quilters who want to sew, have gourmet food fed to them, they don't want to have to make their bed, and they want a little towel animal on their bed each night and have a chocolate on their pillow, and they just want to sew. They don't really care where we're going. A lot of our ladies don't even get off the ship."

Visit stitchinheaven.com.

 

Guest: Rachel May of Quilting With a Modern Slant

Topics: modern quilts, quilting books

She says: "I had been quilting for 4 or 5 years and had joined the Boston Modern Quilt Guild. I was there when it started, so it was with a small group of maybe 10-12 women who helped found it. I was really excited about the friendships and the commnuity we had with each other, and I wanted to write about our friendships, our quilts, and what grew out of this shared love. So that was the origin of the book. In collaboration with the editors, they helped me shape the rhythm of the book and encouraged me to cut the parts into smaller and smaller pieces, so that I was including tips and tutorials, patterns, info about starting a shop -- that was all pieced together like a quilt."

Visit quiltingwithamodernslant.com.

 

Guest: Pat Meinecke of John C. Campbell Folk School

Topics: quilting retreat, quilt piecing tips

She says: "When instructions say mark a dot on each corner where seams intersect, instead of making a dot, I take my ruler and put it on the 1/4" line on the raw seam and just draw a straight line about an 1" long at each corner. And then I go to all four sides of each patch and where the lines intersect is where I want my needle to go down and where I want to match up those points on both sides."

Visit www.folkschool.org.

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