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July 17, 2017 Podcast

Sue Marsh, Deborah Fisher, Annette Plog, and Mathew Boudreaux chat with host Pat Sloan on the American Patchwork & Quilting podcast.

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Listen to the podcast here.

Subscribe to the free show on iTunes here.

 

Guest: Sue Marsh

Topics: designing fabric

She says: "First things start out, of course, with that little piece of an idea of what you're going to do, like that theme. For example, I've got to do aliens. So I get the theme going, and then I'll do pencil drawings of all these little characters. Three quarters of the little characters that start out in pencil don't make it to the final drawing because there are always so many."

Visit www.wpcreek.com.

 

Guest: Deborah Fisher

Topics: quilting inspiration

She says: "When I went to Wisconsin I took with me a quilt that actually my husband's aunt had made for us for our wedding many years ago. When I put the quilt on the bed in Wisconsin, in a state I'd never been to, in a strange town, it really made it feel like home and I thought as soon as I put it on the bed I said, 'Ok, now it feels like home.' I really started thinking about that concept of how a quilt really makes any place feel like home, and so that's how the Bright Hopes collaborative quilt project started -- with 'what if we made quilts for people who had no permanent home at all and they could take this quilt with them wherever they went?"

Visit fishmuseumandcircus.com and brighthopes.org

 

Guest: Annette Plog

Topics: quilt piecing tips

She says: "Knowing to sew helps a lot when you start quilting. I think one of the most important things that you do learn when you do start piecing is seam allowance and how important it is. After that it's basic sewing."

Visit www.petitequilts.com.

 

Guest: Mathew Boudreaux

Topics: designing quilts

He says: "I would suggest anyone who is intimidated by doing a layout on your own, or understanding the relationships between fabrics and quilts, to dabble with fabric weaving because it's a lot less fabric if you mess up and then you can always pull it out. You can see it on a small scale really quickly what it could look like."

Visit Mathew's Instagram.