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Piecing Flying Geese

By using one of these two methods, you'll be piecing together perfect Flying Geese units in no time.

Method 1: Using a Rectangle of One Fabric and Two Squares of a Contrasting Fabric


Press the attached triangle open.

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Method 1: Using a Rectangle of One Fabric and Two Squares of a Contrasting Fabric


Tip for Overlapping Squares

When you’re using the rectangle and two squares method to make Flying Geese, why do the squares overlap at the upper point of the center triangle?

Once sewn together, this overlap is what creates the seam allowance along the upper edge of the pieced Flying Geese unit.

When you sew the Flying Geese unit into a block, this seam allowance will be taken in, leaving the tip of your triangle intact at the seam line. Without it, the tip of the triangle would be sewn into the seam and you’d have no sharp point at the top of the triangle.

Method 1: Using a Rectangle of One Fabric and Two Squares of a Contrasting Fabric


With right sides together, align a marked square with one end of a rectangle; note the placement of the marked diagonal line. Stitch on the marked line.

Method 1: Using a Rectangle of One Fabric and Two Squares of a Contrasting Fabric


Trim the seam allowance to 1/4”.

Method 1: Using a Rectangle of One Fabric and Two Squares of a Contrasting Fabric


Press the attached triangle open.

Method 1: Using a Rectangle of One Fabric and Two Squares of a Contrasting Fabric


Align a second marked square with the opposite end of the rectangle, again noting the placement of the marked diagonal line. Stitch on the marked line, trim as before.

Method 1: Using a Rectangle of One Fabric and Two Squares of a Contrasting Fabric


Press the attached triangle open to make a Flying Geese unit.

Method 2: Using One Large Triangle of One Fabric and Two Small Triangles of a Contrasting Fabric


To determine what size of quarter-square triangle to cut for the center of the Flying Geese unit, add 1-1/4” to the desired finished width of the Flying Geese unit.

To determine what size half-square triangles to cut for the small triangles, add 7/8” to the desired finished height of the Flying Geese unit.

For example, for a 1-1/2x3” finished Flying Geese unit, cut a 4-1/4” square, cutting it diagonally twice in an X to yield four large triangles.

Cut a 2-3/8” square, cutting it diagonally in half to yield two small triangles.

With right sides together, sew a small triangle to a short edge of the large triangle using a 1/4” seam allowance.

Note: The corners of the small triangle will extend 1/4” beyond each end of the large triangle.

Method 2: Using One Large Triangle of One Fabric and Two Small Triangles of a Contrasting Fabric


Press the attached small triangle open, pressing the seam allowance toward the small triangle.

Method 2: Using One Large Triangle of One Fabric and Two Small Triangles of a Contrasting Fabric


In the same manner, join the remaining small triangle to the large triangle.

Method 2: Using One Large Triangle of One Fabric and Two Small Triangles of a Contrasting Fabric


Press the small triangle open to make a Flying Geese unit.

Trim the dog-ears.

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