Close This Ad
More
Close

How to Machine Quilt 7 Common Quilt Blocks

See how to quilt commonly used quilt blocks on your domestic sewing machine. Our step-by-steps make it easy to recreate these quilting designs on your own quilts!

  • Log Cabin: Straight Line

    Diagonal lines quilted the same distance apart in a V shape create chevron designs across a quilt block or top.

    See how here.

  • Log Cabin: Wavy Lines

    Stitching continuous wavy lines in a free-form manner gives a sense of movement across the quilt and sharply contrasts the linear design of the Log Cabin blocks.

    See how here.

  • Four-Patch: Wavy Lines

    Wavy lines alternating horizontally then vertically in adjoining squares are often referred to as a ribbon candy design.

    See how here.

  • Four-Patch: Orange Peel

    Intersecting diagonal lines stitched across a quilt top make up the framework for curved leaves that are often referred to as a Orange Peel design.

    See how here.

  • Nine-Patch: Crosshatch

    Diagonal lines that intersect across a quilt block or top are often referred to as a crosshatch design.

    See how here.

  • Nine-Patch: Orange Peel

    What appears to be an interlocking circle pattern is created by stitching continuous wavy lines. This design is sometimes referred to as an orange peel motif.

    See how here.

  • Rail Fence: Echo

    Quilting 1⁄4" away from the seam lines echoes the lines created by the fabric pieces and seams. Continuing to stitch into adjacent rectangles without cutting threads allows you to sew more quickly.

    See how here.

  • Rail Fence: Orange Peel

    What appears to be an interlocking circle pattern is created by stitching continuous wavy lines. This design is sometimes referred to as an orange peel motif.

    See how here.

  • Hourglass: Stipple

    An allover meandering or puzzle quilting design is commonly called stippling. It involves a series of random curves closely spaced where lines do not cross.

    See how here.

  • Hourglass: Curves

    What appears to be several curved lines is one continuous line of stitching.

    See how here.

  • Strips: Straight Lines

    Stitching horizontal lines across vertical seams creates a plaidlike effect. Vary your stitch length to add interest. On this quilt top the stitch length varies from 2.5–4.0 millimeters.

    See how here.

  • Strips: More Straight Lines

    Stitching diagonal lines through squares and rectangles adds interest to a bricklike quilt top design.

    See how here.

  • Flying Geese: Echo

    Quilting 1⁄4" away from the seam lines echoes the lines created by the fabric pieces and seams. Continuing to stitch into an adjacent Flying Geese block without cutting threads allows you to sew more quickly.

    See how here.

  • Flying Geese: Curves

    What appears to be several curved lines is one continuous line of stitching.

    See how here.