American Patchwork & Quilting | AllPeopleQuilt.com Staff Blog
 

American Patchwork & Quilting

2 posts.

Pat Sloan – Behind the Scenes

I have such a wonderful time interviewing guests for our radio show, and sometime not all we chat about makes it onto the show! Here is another ‘Behind the Scenes’ with wonderful quilt designer Betsy Chutchian!

Betsy We all have parts of the process we ‘prefer’ more than others. What part of quilt making do you ‘Prefer’ most and why?

My favorite part is chosing the fabrics.  Once I have an inspiration, in this case a photo of an antique quilt, I LOVE the hunt for the right fabrics.  Sometimes the hunt begins with a particular piece of fabric, then I find the inspiration quilt and resume the hunt in the stash.
Here the look is soft and very old, early 1800′s.

Most of the fabrics are collections from Moda and Jo Morton for Andover…the fabric study could be called ‘Morton meets Moda’ but I threw in a Windham and a Blue Hill for good measure. The photograph is from the book, Calico and Chintz.  The type of quilt is what today would be termed a ‘blended quilt’.  Moda’s line ’Comfort’ served as the main fabric inspiration, the large scale brown fabric with rusty pink flowers.

With that piece, selecting the rest of the fabrics became really easy.  I started making nine patches and then from some leftover scraps , quickly pieced and quilted a little doll quilt.

What is your favorite item in your studio?
My favorite part is the desk-like sewing table and the wooden sewing machine bed.  My dad made both of these for me.  When I purchased a new machine a few years ago, I had to keep the same brand with the same size arm cutout in order to continue to use what he made for me.  If Pfaff ever changes the arm width, I’m in a heap of trouble.  Dad is is 92 and can’t work in the woodshop anymore.
If you could train with, or work with, or follow one person for a day.. who would it be and why?
Without hesitation, I would love to train or work with Barbara Brackman.  Even for one day, I could learn so much from her, concerning fabric history.  I own her books and  follow her blogs and love studying fabrics of the 19th Century, but reading about colors and printing styles are only good to a point. I would love to hear her say why this reproduction print, or that color, is totally inappropriate for an 1860′s quilt, for example, and then see her point to the right ones and tell me why they work.
Some fun questions for Betsy!

  • Current read –   I just finished The Help and have started 1000 White Women.  I don’t read as much as I would like.
  • Favorite movie – That is a hard choice.  My favorite is probably The Searchers  but To Kill a Mockingbird and Cold Mountainare also at the top of my list.
  • The Color you have always LOVED….. A better question might be what color do you NOT love!  Believe it or not, I love BROWN.  Brown complements everything and never competes for attention.  Besides, it is the color of chocolate, so what’s not to love?

If you have not listened to my interview with Betsy yet… CLICK HERE and listen to the Nov 28, 2011 show!

And listen EACH Monday at 4pm eastern for a new show with new guests. All shows are recorded so download the ones you missed!  See you Monday!

Your Radio Host Pat Sloan


APQ Readers Love ‘Scattered Leaves’

One of my favorite parts of the job is to read the “I Am a Quilter” submissions from our fabulous readers. I love seeing how readers interpret the patterns in our magazines to make them their own. Sometimes the reader versions appear in different colorways, different sizes, different styles, and sometimes they’re very close the originals–all are inspiring!

After we published Scattered Leaves by Pam Buda of Heartspun Quilts in our October 2009 issue (you may remember seeing it on the cover), the reader response was enormous. You loved this pattern! We featured Delores Moore’s batiks version in the most recent “I Am a Quilter” column (read more about it in the October 2010 issue of APQ, on sale now), but there were so many awesome submissions that we thought it would be fun to share more of them here.

In case you don’t remember, here is the original:

Scattered Leaves, the October 2009 APQ cover quilt

And here is Delores’ version made in beautiful batiks:

Before this quilt, Delores was hesitant to combine lots of colors in one quilt. Her version is king size!

Before this quilt, Delores was hesitant to combine lots of colors in one quilt. Her version is king size!

Here are other great takes:

Brenda Hotinger used a very similar colorway, but she added a thin inner border to frame her blocks.

Brenda Hotinger used a very similar colorway, but she added a thin inner border to frame her blocks.

Nancy Fromwiller (left) whipped up this quilt for her step-son's October wedding. Her friend, Lynn Wood (right), machine-quilted it for her. Nancy loved the quilt so much that she also cut pieces for a version she could keep while she did the cutting for this gift quilt.

Nancy Fromwiller (left) whipped up this quilt for her step-son's October wedding. Her friend, Lynn Wood (right), machine-quilted it. Nancy loved the quilt so much that she also cut pieces for a version she could keep while she did the cutting for this gift quilt.

The White Pine Quilt Guild of Harrisville, Michigan, made this quilt for a fund-raising raffle for the Northern Michigan Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. They removed purple and blue from the palette to highlight the warm browns, reds, oranges, and yellows. Bursts of lime green give it some extra kick!

The White Pine Quilt Guild of Harrisville, Michigan, made this quilt for a fund-raising raffle for the Northern Michigan Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. They removed purple and blue from the palette to highlight the warm browns, reds, oranges, and yellows. Bursts of lime green give it some extra kick!

Vella Boyce loved how scrappy Scattered Leaves was. She made her version entirely from scraps that she has saved from other quilt projects. What a great way to make room for more fabric!

Vella Boyce loved the scrappiness of Scattered Leaves. She made her version entirely from scraps that she has saved from other quilt projects. What a great way to make room for more fabric! The light border is also a fun twist.

We did a double take when we saw this smaller version, sans leaves. The original's fall palette reminded Alycia Brown of Halloween, so she simplified the design by replacing the Maple Leaf units with squares and adding black, lime green, and novelty prints to the mix. Her purple border has an overlay of black lace for a spooktacular look!

We did a double take when we saw this smaller version, sans leaves. The original's fall palette reminded Alycia Brown of Halloween, so she simplified the design by replacing the Maple Leaf units with squares and adding black, lime green, and novelty prints to the mix. She also added strips in various widths to two sides of the squares to alter the original design. Her purple border has an overlay of black lace for a spooktacular look!

Marcia Wagge (right) made this quilt in two afters while she recovered from foot surgery. She accomplished her goal of not buying a single piece of fabric to make this quilt.

Marcia Wagge (right) made this quilt in two weeks while she recovered from foot surgery. She accomplished her goal of not buying a single piece of fabric to make the quilt.

Bernie Schert made Scattered Leaves for her brother and sister-in-law, who live in a cottage surrounded by trees and spend much of the fall raking. She used colorful fabrics from her stash and had her friend, Barb Luebbers, machine-quilt leaves and tendrils.

Bernie Schert made Scattered Leaves for her brother and sister-in-law, who live in a cottage surrounded by trees and spend much of the fall raking. She used colorful fabrics from her stash and had her friend, Barb Luebbers, machine-quilt leaves and tendrils.

So, what do you think? Do these inspire you to make a version of Scattered Leaves? If so, download free instructions for our color option of this quilt. I don’t know about you, but these fall-inspired quilts (and the Iowa heat/humidity) have me anxiously awaiting autumn!

If you’ve made a quilt using instructions from American Patchwork & Quilting, Quilts and More, or Quilt Sampler, share it with us! E-mail your “I Am a Quilter” stories and pictures to apq@meredith.com, or mail them to:
American Patchwork & Quilting, I Am a Quilter
1716 Locust St. LN-204
Des Moines, IA 50309