AllPeopleQuilt.com Staff Blog - Part 4
 

Fall Book Club Pick

Girls Get Stitching! 

by Shirley McLauchlan

$21.95; C&T Publishing

Review by Elizabeth Stumbo, assistant art director

 

Plain white T-shirts and boring tote bags will be a thing of the past after reading Girls Get Stitching! by Shirley Mclauchlan. This book is perfect for the young stitcher in your life. The easy-to-follow instructions and inspiring projects will soon have her embellishing items found in her closet and room.

Inspired by her own teenage years and love of creating gifts with her hands, Shirley encourages readers to simply “have a go.” Don’t worry about perfection and straight stitch lines, but instead focus on learning, exploring and creating something unique for yourself or someone special. With 10 basic stitches and 20 adorable project to choose from, the possibilities are endless to personalize clothing, housewares, cards and more! Shirley’s designs are sweet, on-trend and perfect for new or beginning stitchers. Cupcakes on aprons and foxes on pillows are just the beginning of the fun!

Everything needed to get started can be found in the front of the book. Included are a list of basic tools needed with helpful explanations, tips for fabric and thread selection and step-by-step instructions for easy template transfers. Tips on where to find more unusual materials and items are also scattered throughout the project pages. Pretty photography with helpful details of each project make it easy to see Shirley’s stitches and color selections. A special section on creating mood boards helps teach readers how to make strong color, fabric and stitch choices that will help to personalize their projects and instill confidence. Many of the projects also feature additional ideas to encourage readers to mix-and-match patterns.

This book teaches readers to see the potential for creativity everywhere. Take something ordinary and create something truly one-of-a-kind through basic stitches and techniques. What will you embellish today?

 

Buy this book here.

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Fall Book Club Pick

The Master Quilter: An Elm Creek Quilts Novel

by Jennifer Chiaverini

$16.00; Simon and Schuster

Review by Linda Augsburg, executive editor

 

Whether you’re a long-time fan of Jennifer Chiaverini’s Elm Creek Quilt novel series (as I am) or unaware of the series, The Master Quilter is sure to delight and captivate its readers, quilters or not. While the series is set around a (sadly) fictional quilting retreat center, the stories of the eight characters — women with varied lives and backgrounds — will have you identifying with their joys and struggles as the story unfolds and you will certainly connect with one or all of these quilters.

 

In The Master Quilter, recently released in paperback to honor its 10-year anniversary, Chiaverini employs an interesting storytelling angle — how does one person’s circumstance and secret affect a tight-knit circle of friends. In this book, each chapter captures the story of the same few pivotal months for the Elm Creek Quilters. The twist is that the stories are told from each character’s perspective. The shift in perspective speaks to understanding someone only by walking a mile in that person’s shoes, as each character is working through their own challenges while also interacting as part of a group of friends and coworkers. The struggles and changes that face each woman are illustrated in ways that’s relatable and familiar — from 26-year-old Summer’s journey to independent adulthood and Gwen and Judy’s shifting professional paths to matriarch Sylvia’s late-in-life second marriage and the challenges Bonnie faces with both her quilt shop and her shaky marriage. While the original plan of creating a surprise bridal quilt for Sylvia provides a touchstone for many characters through the book, the secret that each quilter is keeping weaves through the story’s plot to add depth.

 

As the sixth book in the Elm Creek Quilts series, The Master Quilter mentions characters from previous stories but Chiaverini provides enough background information to allow a series newcomer to enjoy the book as their first. If you’re a stickler to knowing the order of books, Chiaverini has an FAQ section on her site, elmcreek.net, which provides the order of the stories, since they weren’t originally written as a series. In addition, quilters will appreciate that Chiaverini is a quilter, so references to projects, supplies, and tools are accurate.

 

Treat yourself to a little quilt-focused fiction and make some new fictional friends at Elm Creek Manor. Whether you start with The Master Quilter, or read this one in its proper place in the series, you’ll enjoy the quilt-focused conversation peppered into each chapter and you’ll feel like you’ve gained some new fabric-loving friends along the way.

 

On my “to-make” list: While this book doesn’t have instructions or projects, Jennifer Chiaverini and C&T Publishing released Sylvia’s Bridal Sampler from Elm Creek Quilts that contains images, instructions and diagrams for all 140 blocks in the previously fictional quilt along with images of quilts made by other quilters inspired to make a version of Sylvia’s quilt for themselves.

 

Buy this book here.

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Fall Book Club Pick

Star Quilts

by Mary Knapp

$14.99; C&T Publishing

Review by Jill Abeloe Mead, editor

 

If you’re smitten with star blocks, you’ll want to add this hidden gem of a book to your quilting library. Now out of print, but available an e-Book from the publisher, this 112 page volume by Mary Knapp guides you through drawing (yes, you can!) and constructing 35 amazing star blocks, in 8”, 12”, 15”, and 18” square sizes.

 

At first I was skeptical. The cover claims a “no-math drafting technique”. Rest assured, it’s an accurate statement. Although this book clearly is directed toward the intermediate to advanced quilter, there’s no math involved. (You do have to decide which of the four sizes of blocks you want to draw and sew.)

 

Mary guides you through creating each of her spectacular star block patterns by using one of four included grids (one for each size block). The grids aren’t the graph paper-variety. They are carefully crafted guides that Mary has developed to maintain the proportions in each design, regardless of the finished block size. As per instructions for each of the 35 blocks, you “connect the dots” to draw the desired block, in selected size. Of course, your drawing accuracy is important to the success of the block.

 

She includes a section on cutting and piecing with tips and techniques for making each block. The book includes templates for common shapes, construction tips, piecing and pressing techniques, and a paper-guided piecing tutorial. Assembly instructions are included for each of the 35 blocks.

 

The final section features a collection of five compelling projects: throws, a wall hanging, table topper, and table runner. Any of the projects would make a showcase suitable for your finished star blocks.

 

 

Buy this book here.

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Fall Book Club Pick

Knot Thread Stitch

by Lisa Solomon

$22.99; Quarry Books

Review by Jill Abeloe Mead, editor

 

Warning: I am an inveterate maker-of-stuff and this book is dangerous. I want to make every single one of the 17 projects included in this little book (except I will substitute my wanna-have Golden Retriever for the shown Chihuahua and Corgi-esque pooches in project: Pet Portraits).

 

This book is inspiring. It’s charming. Author Lisa Solomon, a fearless mixed-media artist, presents all the usual (but informative and stunningly photographed) getting started information…fabric, thread, tools, transferring designs, etc., in the opening pages. Then, she jumps straight into the really good stuff…the inspiring projects… but not before she gives you permission to use her ideas as a jumping-off point to do your own thing. Wait, wait there’s more. She shows her project and then hands each concept over to an artist or crafting friend to create their own take on her idea. And, she shows both projects and gives ideas, inspiration, and instruction for achieving great results with each.

 

With a tiny investment in needle and thread and something to stitch on, you can follow along and make what Lisa and other designers, bloggers, artists, and crafters have made. Or, you can create own take on each concept. You’ll learn not only 19 basic embroidery stitches, but also how to embellish stitches with mixed media. See-and-make a hand-carved stamp design (a delightful steam iron on a purchased apron), stitches on Shrinky-Dink zipper pulls and key chains, painted-and-stitched T-shirt (an irresistible, yellow Mini Cooper), robot finger puppets, cloud- embroidered pillowcases (for a heavenly night’s sleep), and more.

 

Rather than being a stitch-by-the-numbers book, this 144-page paperback is an idea book. Though instructions and patterns are presented for making each of the projects as shown, you are encouraged and invited to take your own creative wanderings from the path given to make small, fun, quirky and clever things. Take the challenge.

Buy this book here.

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Fall Book Club Pick

Bargello Quilts In Motion: A New Look for Strip-Pieced Quilts

by Ruth Ann Berry

$19.95; C&T Publishing

Review by Linda Augsburg, executive editor

 

The bargello pattern, also referred to as flame stitch, emerged in needlepoint in the 17th century. It emerged on the quilting scene in the ’90s, yet another technique made easier by the innovative rotary cutting and strip-piecing quilting methods. Those early bargello quilts mirrored their needlework counterparts with their zigzagging or swag-like designs. Today, the look of bargello quilts has changed dramatically, thanks to books like Bargello Quilts in Motion and the techniques explained by author Ruth Ann Berry.

 

You don’t need to be an artist or a technical genius to make a stunning bargello quilts like the ones in Bargello Quilts in Motion. In fact, the instructions and color information provided in this book makes it easy for you to make one of the quilt projects similar in colors to the ones shown, plus the helpful tips about fabric selection give you the confidence to choose your personal favorite color scheme. Projects mix unlikely prints (from florals and batiks to novelties) with tonal prints, hand-dyeds and solids for visual impact. But it’s the twisting and turning of what Berry calls the scribbles that has me wanting to put rotary cutter to fabric. Her design skills make the ribbons of gradations seem to entwine as they move across the quilt, and that’s what’s most intriguing about Bargello Quilts in Motion. Thankfully, as a finale to the clearly explained and illustrated projects, Berry shares details on how to design a bargello quilt with turns and twists with specifics on how to determine the width of the strip sets to achieve the look you desire. Her helpful hints will empower you to design your own motion-filled bargello quilt.

 

In all, the eight project quilts included in this 64-page book are accompanied by information on selecting fabric, basic bargello construction, borders, layering and binding, and an inspirational design gallery. The final chapter that covers designing your own has very clear illustrations and information about how to make the strip sets twist and turn as shown in the projects. So let yourself go and try something new — pick up Bargello Quilts in Motion.

 

On my “to-make” list: It wasn’t easy to choose just one, but I’m choosing Moody Blues (page 20). For the background fabrics, Berry used eight floral prints with a black foundation — you’d expect that to be pretty low-contrast, but you’d be wrong. In her words “The floral prints in this quilt all have a black background, but it seems like the value changes depending on the number of colored motifs on each background. The ‘lightest’ black floral is packed with bright flowers, while the ‘darkest’ black floral has only a few scattered flowers.” And then, after the cover quilt, Batikiello (page 12) and Asleep at the Beach (page 40) to give me a better understanding of the colorplay, I might try my hand at designing one of my own!

 

Buy this book here.

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