AllPeopleQuilt.com Staff Blog - Part 3
 

Make It Tonight: Square Pincushion

Fabric: Winter’s Kiss collection by Lonni Rossi for Andover Fabrics

Choose a favorite fabric and make this quick-to-sew pincushion. Stack two buttons to top of your cute creation for bright accents. Make a bunch for your sewing friends or keep one handy for on-the-go sewing. This project is courtesy of our sewing blog, howtosew.com. Visit daily for new sewing projects and easy home decor.

 

Materials:

  • 2–4-1/2″ squares red print
  • Polyester fiberfill
  • 1–1-3/8″ diameter white button
  • 1–5/8″ diameter yellow button

 

 

Assemble the Pincushion:

 

 

pincushion

1. Layer two red print 4-1/2″ squares with right sides together. Pin pieces together.

 

 

 

pincushion

2. Beginning in the middle of one edge, sew together pieces using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Leave a 1-1/2″ opening along one edge for turning.

 

pincushion

3. Turn right side out. Use a chopstick or knitting needle to push out corners; press.

 

http://howtosew.com/blog/sewing-basics/press-success

4. Use a chopstick or knitting needle to gently push small tufts of fiberfill through the 1-1/2″ opening.

 

pincushion

5. Using a needle and matching thread, sew the opening closed.

6. Stack and sew buttons through all layers to complete pincushion.

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Trend Talk: Paper-Piecing

Every month, we highlight a trend in quilting and show you how you can add this hip style to your projects!

Paper-piecing is hot right now! From beautiful and intricate quilt patterns to helpful products and books to get you started with this technique, we’re seeing paper-piecing across the quilting world!

 

 

Paper-piecing products for your shopping list (in order going clockwise):

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Blogs We <3 This Month

Once a month, we highlight blogs our staff is reading right now!

 

Hyacinth Quilt Designs

Designer Cindy Lammon shares her creative designs, fun tutorials (including that quilt shown above), and her works in progress! She’s inspiring, has fresh color and design ideas, and features beautiful photography!

Read her blog here.

 

 

 

Material Girl

Designer Amanda Castor features easy how-tos (we love her “how to hang a mini quilt” blog shown here), pretty pictures, and frequent posts, that always give new ideas and fresh inspiration. She frequently does smaller projects, which is a great reminder that new techniques and projects can easily be achieved in small steps!

Read her blog here.

My Quilt Diet
Designer Marion McClellan has a great mix of both traditional and modern quilts. From classic piecing to appliqué to foundation piecing, Marion experiments with it all and showcases her beautiful designs and inspiration on her blog. Plus, she’s hosting a super-fun Blocks From the Past Quiltalong right now on her blog.

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Reading List

Each month, we highlight the books we’re reading in the office. January is the month to make crafting resolutions and be inspired and renewed in your creativity! These books will help you reach a sewing goal, learn a new skill, or just take more time to be creative!

 

The Little Spark: 30 Ways to Ignite Your Creativity

By Carrie Bloomston for C&T Publishing

Ignite your inner creative spark with the 30 engaging exercises, fun activities, inspirational images, and motivating ideas in this book. Learn what your Little Spark of creative passion looks like, how to capture it, and how to make room for it in your life. Use it as a month-long creative roadmap or just dip into the exercises as your time and inclination allow. Either way, you will change your life.

Buy this book here.

 

 

Free-Motion Quilting for Beginners and Those Who Think They Can’t

By Molly Hanson for Martingale

Been dragging your feet on learning to machine-quilt? This is the year! Learn to free-motion quilt on your home sewing machine. Try 10 different quilting designs, including stippling variations, pebbles, square meander, and swirls. Then master the fundamentals of free-motion quilting on manageable fat-quarter-sized fabric pieces and turn the pieces into projects you’ll love.

Buy this book here.

 

 

Savor Each Stitch: Studio Quilting with Mindful Design

By Carolyn Friedlander for Lucky Spool Media

Explore how selecting materials combined with playing with the design can help you slow down and enjoy the process of quilting. This book contains eight quilts each with a multitude of color way options. Projects range from table runners to full-size quilts each encouraging readers to play with design possibilities to create unique quilts of their own. Hand quilting, needle-turn appliqué, thoughtful design choices, and experimentation replace the fast and easy counterparts found in many pattern books.

Buy this book here.

 

 

Quilting the New Classics: 20 Inspired Quilt Projects

By Michele Muska for Sixth & Spring Books

No matter what their style, all quilters draw inspiration and creative vision from quilts of the past. This book reinterprets 10 traditional quilt patterns into two gorgeous designs — one a traditional interpretation, the other modern. Along the way, it also presents galleries of quilts both past and present, demonstrating how quilters can use visual inspiration to transform traditional patterns into unique quilt designs.

Buy this book here.

 

 

 

Sewing to Sell: How to Sell Locally & Online

By Virginia Lindsay for C&T Publishing

If starting a crafting business was on your to-do list this year, this book is a must-have! This practical guide from professional sewist Virginia Lindsay includes everything you need to know to start sewing for profit. From  creating a product line to identifying customers, pricing and selling your work, marketing yourself, handling the business and legal side of sewing and more, this book gives you all the tool to start making money from your passion. And that’s not all! You also get 16 projects that you can start sewing and selling right now.

Buy this book here.

 

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Perfect Your Skills: Adding Labels

 

Preserve the heritage of your quilts for future generations while expressing your creativity with labels.

 

Here are some ideas for what to include on the label:

  • who made the quilt
  • the quilt pattern name
  • date and place where it was completed.
  • whom the quilt was given to
  • the occasion, such as a graduation, retirement, or anniversary, that prompted the making of the quilt
  • care instructions

 

Here are some ideas for making a quilt label your own:

  • Draw or embroider the words and add embellishments, such as vines, flowers, or French knots.
  • Incorporate one or more extra blocks from the quilt top into the label.
  • For a framed finish, bind the label edges like a mini quilt. Sew leftover binding from the quilt around the label edges, then turn the binding over the edge to the wrong side. Hand-stitch the bound label to the backing, taking care not to stitch through to the top.
  • To ensure a label can’t easily be removed from the quilt, stitch the label to the backing fabric and quilt through it.
Here are 8 tips for writing on fabric:
1. Choose a smooth-surface, 100%-cotton fabric. Permanent ink pens perform better on all-cotton fabrics than on blends.

2. Select fabric in a color that allows the ink to show. Avoid white-on-white prints because the pattern is painted on the fabric rather than dyed into it.

3. Prewash your fabric (cotton fabrics usually contain sizing, which acts as a barrier to ink penetration).

4. Purchase pens that have permanent ink and are made for use on fabric. A fine point (size 01, .25 millimeter) writes delicately and is less likely to bleed as it writes. Lines can be made thicker by going over them more than once. For larger letters or numbers, a size 05 (.45 millimeter) pen works well.

5. Test the pen on a fabric sample, then follow the manufacturer’s directions for setting the ink. Wait 24 hours for the ink to set, then wash the sample as you would the quilt. The extra time it takes to run such a test will pay off in years of durability.

6. If you don’t care to use your handwriting or just want to ensure nicely spaced letters, type your words using computer software. Adjust the size and spacing to fit your label size; space out letters a little more than normal to allow for the width of the marker tip. Print out the words onto paper and trace.

7. Practice on fabric scraps first. Write slowly and with a lighter touch than you would normally use when writing on paper. This allows time for the ink to flow into the fabric and lets you control the letters.

8. Stabilize the fabric and create guidelines for words with freezer paper. To do so, cut a piece of freezer paper bigger than the label. Use a ruler and a thick black marker to draw evenly spaced lines on the freezer paper’s dull side. Press the shiny side of the freezer paper to the fabric’s wrong side with a hot dry iron. After marking on the fabric, peel off the freezer-paper guide.

 

 

Printing By Computer

1. To print a quilt label directly onto fabric using your computer, look for printer fabric sheets, which feed into an ink jet printer, in fabric and quilt stores. Or prepare your own fabric using a fixative, such as Bubble Jet Set 2000, to ensure the printing will be permanent.

2. First print the label on paper to ensure the design and words appear as desired and there is room for seam allowances. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for printing, peeling off the paper backing, and setting, then trim the label to the desired size.

3. To create a custom label design, use word processing, desktop publishing, scrapbooking, or label-making software to combine text, photos, and clip art.

 

Tracing By Hand

1. Make sure the design you want to trace is dark enough to show through your fabric, or locate a light box or sunny window on which to work.

2. Lay a piece of fabric over a paper printout of the label. With masking tape, anchor the fabric and the paper to your writing surface so they won’t shift.

3. Using a fabric marking pen, trace slowly, drawing a steady line. Darken the lines by drawing over them again, or add color with permanent-ink pens or brushes.