Tutorial | AllPeopleQuilt.com Staff Blog - Part 2
 

Tutorial

29 posts.

We Heart It, It’s Free

Once a month, we highlight our favorite free quilt and sewing patterns around the web!

 

 

 

Tonga Cabana Tassel Table Runner by Janaé King for Timeless Treasures

It uses precuts, it’s scrappy, and reminds us of the beach. Do we need any more excuses to make this beautiful table runner?

Click here to get the free pattern.

 

 

Poolside Pillows by Coats & Clark

This is a great intro to outdoor fabric and outdoor thread! Plus, these pillows are a perfect way to add pops of color to your deck, outdoor playtime, and the beach!

Click here to get the free pattern.

 

Ultimate Summer Hexie Coasters by CraftyPod for Robert Kaufman Fabrics

We’re pretty much obsessed with both solids and hexagons in the office! So you can bet these fresh and fun coasters are on our to-do list for summer!

Click here to get the free pattern.

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Perfect Your Skills: Hand-Piecing Tips

Each month, learn a fun trick or tip to make your quilting easier and more polished! This month, learn to love hand piecing, the technique favored by designer Jen Kingwell of Amitié Textiles. Love her look in the pillow below? Get her tips for making hand-piecing easier!

(From American Patchwork & Quilting February 2014. Buy the digital issue here.)

  • I make my templates from template plastic and write the pattern name and any identifying numbers or letters on each one with an ultrafine permanent marker. I store them in sandwich-size ziplock bags.
  • For fabric markers I prefer a mechanical pencil with a 2B lead or a fine chalk pencil, usually white.
  • When tracing around templates I use a sandpaper board. It holds the fibers firmly, which reduces distortion.
  • Good-quality cotton fabrics give the best results.
  • I prefer size 11 straw needles from Jeana Kimball. These fine needles have a straight shaft that glides through the fabric easily. They are also long, which allows me to take several running stitches at a time.
  • I love Machine Embroidery Thread (also called Broder Thread) from DMC. It is a 50-weight two-ply thread and comes in a fabulous color range. I find the finer the thread and needle, the more accurate the seams.
  • The first thing I do is put a quilter’s knot in my thread: I hold my threaded needle in my dominant hand. I take the end of my thread in my other hand and loop it so about 1″ of this end lies on my needle. With my dominant hand, which is still holding the needle, I hold the end of the thread in place. With my other hand I wrap the thread around the needle three to four times. With my fingers holding the wrap on the needle firmly, I use my nondominant hand to pull the needle through the wrap, continuing to hold until this knot stops at the end of the thread. It’s quick and easy and is never too bulky.
  • To finish a seam I take a small backstitch: Before pulling the thread all the way through the fabric, I bring my needle through the loop, which effectively ties a knot. To prevent unraveling, I cut the thread but leave about a 1⁄4″ tail.

Make It Tonight: Easiest Tote Bag

bag

Fabrics: Nana’s Pantry collection by Mama’s Cottons for Connecting Threads

 

Here’s a good first tote bag project that will instatntly become your go-to pattern! Plus, the bag is made with a doubled seam so no unfinished fabric edges show. This project is courtesy of our sewing blog, howtosew.com. Visit daily for new sewing projects and easy home decor.

 

Materials:

bag

  • 4—18×21″ pieces (fat quarters) assorted prints (bag, bag lining)
  • 1-1/3 yards 1″-wide webbing (straps)
  • 2—17×20″ pieces paper-backed, iron-on fusible web (such as Steam-A-Seam 2 or Wonder Under)

 

Finished tote bag: 15″w x 14″h (not including straps)

**Sew this project with 1/4″ and 1/2″ seams.

 
Prepare Fabrics:

1. Press all fabrics to remove wrinkles and fold lines.

 

bag

2. Following manufacturer’s instructions, center and press a paper-backed, fusible-web piece onto wrong side (unprinted side) of one bag fabric piece; let cool. Peel off paper backing.
bag

3. Layer a bag lining piece wrong side down on first fabric piece; smooth out from center to edges. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse pieces together.

4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 with remaining bag and bag lining fabric pieces to make two prepared fabric pieces.

 

 

Cut Fabrics:

From each set of prepared fabrics, cut:

  • 1—16-1/2″ each square

From webbing, cut:

  • 2—24″-long pieces

 

 

Assemble Tote Bag:

bag

1. Turn under one edge of a 16-1/2″-square prepared fabric piece 1/2″; press.
2. Turn under same edge again 1″; press.

 

bag

3. Insert ends of 24″-long webbing piece under last fold of prepared fabric 4-3/4″ from outer edges. Sew webbing in place.

bag

4. Fold and press webbing toward top edge. Topstitch 1/8″ and 7/8″ from top edge to make a bag unit.

bag

5. Repeat steps 1–4 to make second bag unit.

 

bag

6. Layer the bag units with lining sides together. Pin in place. Using 1/4″ seam allowance, sew together bag units along sides and bottom edge.
bag

7. Trim  corners close to the seam line.
8. Turn to opposite side (lining side out); press.
bag

9. Using 1/2″ seam allowance, sew along sides and bottom edge to complete bag.
10. Turn bag right side out; press.

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We Heart It, It’s Free

Once a month, we highlight our favorite free quilt and sewing patterns around the web!

 

 

 

Garden Stars and Stripes by Tracey Jacobsen for Moda Bake Shop

Americana meets French General in this quilt. It adds a touch of patriotic flair (and history) to a table or wall for Fourth of July!

Click here to get the free pattern.

 

 

Boutique Bones by Julie Hirt of 627handworks

Using six fat quarters, this dog bed cover is so cute (and easy!). And we can’t get over how fun the pieced bones are!

Click here to get the free pattern.


Perfect Your Skills: Dimensional Flying Geese

Each month, learn a fun trick or tip to make your quilting easier and more polished! This month, learn how to add texture to your quilt with dimensional flying geese units!

 

(Love this quilt? Find it it the August 2013 issue of American Patchwork & Quilting.) 

 

To make one dimensional Flying Geese unit, gather two 2″ squares and one 2×3-1/2″ rectangle. Lay the rectangle vertically on your work surface. Fold the rectangle in half with wrong side inside to make a folded unit. Place the folded unit on the right side of one square, aligning side and bottom edges; pin. Place remaining square right side down on top of folded unit; sew through all layers with a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. Open stitched unit and press seam in one direction. Refold rectangle so that the center crease aligns with the seam, forming a triangle, to make a Flying Geese unit. Press well and, if desired, baste bottom edges. The unit should be 3-1/2×2″ including seam allowances.